American attitudes on interracial dating

The percentage of intermarried Whites more than tripled from 2.7% in 1980 to 8.5% 2014.Though this rate of growth is not as high as that of the Black population, it is a larger component of the general rise in intermarriage.If White people were marrying without regard for race, we’d expect 17% of them to intermarry.In actuality, though, only 2.7% of White people intermarried.

That’s partially why White people were three times less likely to intermarry in 1980 than in 2014: there were half as many opportunities.Jeter, a Black and Native American woman, and Loving, a White man, fell in love and decided to get married.They lived in Virginia, one of the states that still banned “miscegenation” – the derogatory term used to describe interracial coupling – so they needed to travel to the District of Columbia to be officially recognized as a couple.Today, there are proportionately more Asians, Hispanics and people of other racial/ethnic backgrounds in the United States than ever.These racial/ethnic groups have always been unusually likely to intermarry.Only about 17% of young married people were not White in 1980, compared to 35% today.So what would America’s intermarriage rate look like if the country had not become more diverse?The were between Blacks and Whites, nearly twenty times higher than in 1950.And more than 15% were “intermarriages” – marriages between people who don’t identify as the same racial or ethnic group, up from 6.7% in 1980.In 1980, less than 4% of all married Black people under the age of 35 were not married to other black people. But Black people only made up between six to seven percent of the total under 35 married population during this period.So while this is a substantial increase, it accounts for less than 1% of the overall increase in interracial marriages.

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